Joan Cole

Joan Cole

Joan Cole
(1943-1943)
Nationality: us United States


JOAN COLE, BIOGRAPHY


Joan Cole has been fascinated with color since age five when she stood at the family piano bench, dissolving construction paper in Skippy jars of water, then mixing and remixing the results. Those “watercolors” of her childhood were the beginning of her life-long experimentation in visual arts.

At age eight, for the centerpiece of the dining room table, she created a miniature landscape in a gallon mayonnaise jar, complete with mosses, sticks, and the occasional green garden snake or praying mantis.

Not till she had graduated from college and began teaching high school English was Cole able to begin more formal pursuit of her art studies. She took her first oil painting class at the George Walter Vincent Smith Art Museum in her hometown--Springfield, Massachusetts—not far from the home of Dr. Seuss (Theodor Geisel) of Mulberry Street fame. She has been pursuing her art education ever since while teaching and raising her family.

As a young mother, she learned to make collagraphic prints from her neighbor and friend Lucy Mueller White. Joan got most of her inspiration from Mother Nature, using a variety of dried plants and insects to create her plates. Although Lucy cautioned Joan never to attach anything thicker than a dime to her print-making plates, Joan pushed the limits of plate thickness. After a fishing expedition to Lake Champlain with her family, Cole returned with a plate fashioned from the tails of Northern Pike. Needless to say, Lucy was not pleased, since some of the tailbones were considerably thicker than a stack of dimes. Although the print from that plate never won any awards (which others had), they did manage to run it through Lucy’s press without ripping the well soaked Arches paper. To this day, her son, Jeff, still displays one of those framed prints in his home.

Today, Cole specializes in landscapes. She is at her happiest painting in oils en plein air, as the French would say (or outdoors, to us in America). You’ll find her on her front porch, in a field, or by the roadside, decked out in a broad-brimmed hat and dressed in a mismatched layer of paint-covered clothing. In winter, Mukluks and diving gloves are de rigueur. The rest of the year, she sports latex gloves. She looks forward to painting on location whenever she and her husband, Roger, travel.

Joan and her husband have lived in Deep River, Connecticut, since 1980. She is an elected artist member of the Essex Art Association and an associate member of art associations in Clinton, Lyme, and Madison. You may view her work at . Many of her paintings hang in private collections throughout the U.S. She may be contacted through her website or at . She welcomes you to her studio by prior appointment at (860) 526-2265.


Articles:

140HOURS Online Art Auction Benefits Haiti


After the earthquake in Haiti in 2009, I donated my painting "Euonymous on Fire #2" to an online auction organized by . Artists from all over the world donated their paintings for this cause. 100% of all funds raised were donated to Doctors Without Borders and the International Medical Corps (IMC), working in Haiti as a response to the recent earthquake.


MY ART WORK REFLECTS MY LOVE OF NATURE


Joan Cole


The two New England states that I have NOT lived and taught in are Vermont and Maine. Yet the roots of my dad’s family were upstate in the former. And part of my heart lives on Monhegan, an island ten miles off the coast of the latter where artists have painted since the 1700’s. I’m a Yankee at heart. My parents lived through the Great Depression. A factory worker, dad was never too proud to do whatever job he could get in order to keep his little sweetie and his three girls fed and sheltered. We never had much money, but Mom stayed home, cooking, cleaning, gardening, canning, raising us girls, and managing the family finances. An incredible cook, she made homemade pies, bread, grape jelly, you name it; she could make dinner from just about anything. Nothing ever went to waste. Mom and dad liked to fish; whatever they caught, we ate. I remember also eating venison, bear, squirrel, raccoon, maybe even opossum; I don’t know where it all came from. They took no pleasure in killing. They had a reverence for all of life. Their spirits were most at peace in the woods, in the middle of a stream, or on a lake. My dad always said that his Dad’s grandmother had been a Native American, Abnaki, he believed. At the same time he treasured the thought of that heritage, he and mom instilled in me their deep Christian convictions and Congregational upbringing. Independent even in their religion; everyone has a vote in a Congregational church.

What has all of that to do with my art? My art represents my personal connection with the beauty of the world around me. My paintings are my attempts to celebrate that beauty. When I am painting outdoors, I become absorbed in my surroundings. My favorite book as a child was Gene Stratton Porter’s Girl of the Limberlost; set at the turn of the last century, it is the story of a young women who lived in the middle of a Midwest forest and swamp, collecting butterflies and moths. When I paint, I become that girl. I drink in the juicy green of mosses beneath my feet and revel in any flower that might be blooming nearby. I am in awe of the ocean when I’m painting on its shore and feel its pounding in my chest. Bluebird or hawk; spring or fall; mountain or valley; river or marsh; bluet or hydrangea; dandelion or rose; snow or rain, willow or maple; oak or pine; light and shadow: I see this magnificence around me and want to hold it up for the rest of the world to see. Always in my art I strive to share my reverence for nature.

When I’m not painting outdoors, you can find me in my studio or off taking a class to develop my skills. I am so indebted to all the teachers I’ve been fortunate enough to study with through the years. I never can learn “enough” to capture exactly what I see and feel, but that reaching is part of the joy of painting for me.





40 Tower Hill Lake Road
Deep River, CT 06417
(860) 526-2265
joancoleartist
pub/joan-cole


JOAN COLE IS NATIVE TO NEW ENGLAND


JOAN COLE, BIOGRAPHY


Joan Cole has been fascinated with color since age five when she stood at the family piano bench, dissolving construction paper in Skippy jars of water, then mixing and remixing the results. Those “watercolors” of her childhood were the beginning of her life-long experimentation in visual arts.

At age eight, for the centerpiece of the dining room table, she created a miniature landscape in a gallon mayonnaise jar, complete with mosses, sticks, and the occasional green garden snake or praying mantis.

Not till she had graduated from college and began teaching high school English was Cole able to begin more formal pursuit of her art studies. She took her first oil painting class at the George Walter Vincent Smith Art Museum in her hometown--Springfield, Massachusetts—not far from the home of Dr. Seuss (Theodor Geisel) of Mulberry Street fame. She has been pursuing her art education ever since while teaching and raising her family.

As a young mother, she learned to make collagraphic prints from her neighbor and friend Lucy Mueller White. Joan got most of her inspiration from Mother Nature, using a variety of dried plants and insects to create her plates. Although Lucy cautioned Joan never to attach anything thicker than a dime to her print-making plates, Joan pushed the limits of plate thickness. After a fishing expedition to Lake Champlain with her family, Cole returned with a plate fashioned from the tails of Northern Pike. Needless to say, Lucy was not pleased, since some of the tailbones were considerably thicker than a stack of dimes. Although the print from that plate never won any awards (which others had), they did manage to run it through Lucy’s press without ripping the well soaked Arches paper. To this day, her son, Jeff, still displays one of those framed prints in his home.

Today, Cole specializes in landscapes. She is at her happiest painting in oils en plein air, as the French would say (or outdoors, to us in America). You’ll find her on her front porch, in a field, or by the roadside, decked out in a broad-brimmed hat and dressed in a mismatched layer of paint-covered clothing. In winter, Mukluks and diving gloves are de rigueur. The rest of the year, she sports latex gloves. She looks forward to painting on location whenever she and her husband, Roger, travel.

Joan and her husband have lived in Deep River, Connecticut, since 1980. She is an elected artist member of the Essex Art Association and an associate member of art associations in Clinton, Lyme, and Madison. You may view her work at . Many of her paintings hang in private collections throughout the U.S. She may be contacted through her website or at . She welcomes you to her studio by prior appointment at (860) 526-2265.


"Moraine" is my latest painting!


"Moraine" is a 24 x 12 inch acrylic painting on a gallerywrap canvas.


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